Tag Archives: First aid

Looking after your Health

Recently 15 club members, including coaches, completed emergency first aid training – supported by the club. During the training, these members learned about basic first aid treatments, CPR and defibrillators.  Thanks to these members for giving their time and being willing to offer assistance in the event of an emergency.

These first aid trained club members are spread across all the squads and are in addition to the club members who are medically trained, or are already trained first aiders.

If you should require emergency first aid assistance, there are quite a few people who can help.  They will tell you that they have been trained.

Recording of trained first aiders

If you are first aid trained, please advise the club secretary so we can record your details on the database. This will allow the club to plan further first aid courses at an appropriate time.

Club First Aid Equipment

The club has a defibrillator for use when people’s hearts stop.  It is fixed on the eastern wall of the RRC boat bay between the sculling and sweep oar racks.  Check it out next time you are taking out oars.

Two club first aid kits are available for emergencies. The portable kit is designed to be taken to regattas (stored in the grey cupboard under the back stairs) and the other kit is designed to be left at the club (stored in the Gym on the shelf above the kitchen bench).

Club first aid equipment is for EMERGENCY first aid. It is not stocked to provide bandaids or tape for blisters, or pain relief if you have a headache.

Personal responsibility for managing medical conditions

Club members are expected to take personal responsibility for their medical conditions.

Whilst your health may feel like a private matter, consider how you’d feel if the person rowing in the seat in front of you had a medical condition they didn’t tell you about and you watched on helpless while they had an emergency that you could have treated if you’d known about their condition.

  • Blister management – tape your fingers; wear gloves; wash hands carefully after rowing to prevent infection and follow medical advice (everyone’s body reacts differently)
  • Sun and Cold – take precautions against sun exposure and the cold – appropriate clothing layers, head gear and sunscreen (coxes may need to rug up)
  • Follow your asthma plan – if you have diagnosed asthma tell your coach and crew members and carry a puffer & spacer with you in the boat (disposable/flat pack cardboard spacers are available)
  • Anaphylactic reactions – tell your coach and crew members and carry an EpiPen in the boat
  • Diabetes – tell your coach and crew members and carry jelly beans/sugar hit in the boat

Any questions, suggestions, want to help?  Talk to Steve Sheppard (OH&S Rep).

Kathy Macrow

Defib training

The AED will be installed and club members are invited to come along and learn how to use the AED. Instruction will also cover first aid measures for sprains, strains, use of slings, management of near drowning, CPR and how to use an AED. Members are invited and strongly urged to come along! Once you are aware of them, you will start to notice AEDs everywhere you go. Please let me know if you plan to attend as numbers are limited to 20 people: reply to ggoss@tpg.com.au.

Automated External Defibrillator at RRC

A few years ago, while playing in our regular Monday evening social mixed doubles comp, one of my team members, Malcolm* collapsed on court having suffered a cardiac arrest. He was 47, with no previous history of heart disease. Not long after, my daughter was diagnosed with a particular heart arrhythmia that has been associated with sudden death during exercise. Malcolm’s life was saved because the tennis club had an Automated External Defibrilltor (AED), and, together with prompt CPR, the AED was used within two minutes. The AED was available, and people knew how to use it: otherwise he would have died that evening. AEDs are the only known device that stops chaotic electrical heart activity and allows the heart to re-establish itself to a normal rhythm.

Today Malcolm is back at work and plays tennis regularly. Since these events I have become interested and aware of programs aimed at fitting all sporting clubs with AEDs and I am proud to say that RRC has been successful in obtaining an AED through this grant system.

The survival rate from cardiac arrest is about 6-8 %, but when AEDs are available it can rise to 35-45%. Time is critical. You cannot do any harm when someone is having a cardiac arrest as they would die if there is no intervention. The minimum ambulance arrival time is 9 minutes., but brain damage starts after 3-4 minutes. This can be avoided if people recognize cardiac arrest, start CPR and use an AED. AEDs are portable and designed to be used by virtually anyone to save a life. Defibrillation within 3 minutes increases the chance of survival from 5% to over 70%.

The AED will be installed on August 15th at 6.30pm and club members are invited to come along and learn how to use the AED. Instruction will also cover first aid measures for sprains, strains, use of slings, management of near drowning, CPR and how to use an AED. Members are invited and strongly urged to come along! Once you are aware of them, you will start to notice AEDs everywhere you go. Please let me know if you plan to attend as numbers are limited to 20 people: reply to ggoss@tpg.com.au.

You may never be called upon to use one, but let me tell you, if you are involved in saving a life because you knew CPR and knew how to use an AED- it’s a pretty cool thing to do.

Geraldine Goss